You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘tax credit’ tag.

All the talk among Realtor’s, Mortgage Brokers, Investor’s and first time home buyers is about whether or not the first time home buyer $8,000 tax credit will be extened past May 1, 2010.  Everyone working in Real Estate has enjoyed the surge of sales this tax credit has provided during the past several months. 

It appears certain that the $8,000 First Time Home Buyers tax credit will not be extended past May 1, 2010.  Everyone is wondering what the impact will be while enjoying the final surge of people buying during this last week of April.  Mortgage Brokers and Realtor’s are secretly asking one another what will happen next to the real estate market. 

I am an investor and from my perspective we are still working right in the heart of the Perfect Storm caused by the glut of distressed properties on the market.  Never before has there been such a transfer of real estate wealth caused by the greed of Wall Street.  Today’s home buyers can purchase property as if shopping at Macy’s inventory reduction sale.  Just like finding your favorite clothes marked down 30%, homes can readily be purchased at sharp discounts in most markets across America.   I expect to continue to see some strong movement in the real estate market for the coming months due to the incredible deals that are readily available to home buyers.

The second reason I believe the market will stay strong for several months is the second condition of this perfect storm.  Very low interest rates.  With decent credit home buyers are still financing homes with interest rates in the low 5% range.  In fact we have a closing on a home that was purchased from us scheduled to close may 7th and the borrower qualified for a rate of 4-1/8%.  The very low interest rates will not last forever and the fact is they worth far more than the $8,000 tax credit, assuming the average American spends the $8,000 and does not re-invest it for a profit over the next 15 years.

The third reason I believe the market will stay strong for a while is the wide availability of grants.  In Virginia where I live, and in many states across our nation there are many grants still available to first time home buyers.  We recently sold another home in Virginia where the borrower qualified for a $10,000 grant.  Again, that grant exceeds to return of the $8,000 tax credit.

The good news is that I believe homes will continue to sell for the next several months.  The key to your sales is the same as always:

1.  Property condition:  There are a lot of homes still on the market; to make yours stand out from the others be sure it is 100% clean, clutter free and well maintained inside and outside.  Be sure the outdoor space is appealing with a well cut lawn, mulched flower beds and trimmed bushes.

2.  Marketing:  The majority of home buyers begin their search on-line.  Be sure that your home is marketed heavily on the internet.  You should be sure to have your home listed onto the MLS either list it yourself with a great flat fee MLS listing service such as http://www.justlistem.com or find a strong realtor.  Your home should be listed on craigslist, zillow and trulia along with the MLS.  In addition to internet marketing and the MLS, be sure you have a property flyer along side a great for sale sign that is easily read when people are driving by your home.

3.  Price:  In this market you need to consider your listing price carefully.  Take time to review the comparables of recent homes sold in your neighborhood, speak to a strong Realtor or simply have it appraised.  You will want to price your home competetively and be sure to offer the new Buyer assistance with their closing costs to make it easy for them to purchase your home.

Sit back, relax and enjoy this perfect storm.  There should continue to be strong sales for the next several months due to low interest rates, readily available grant funds and the continued great opportunities to buy.

What do you think the impact of no longer having the $8,000 first time home buyers tax rebate will be?  Leave me your opinions in the comments.  I would love to know your thoughts.

Advertisements

invest-now.jpgThe Senate has agreed to extend the first time home buyers tax credit.   Approximately 1.5 Million first time home buyers have taken advantage of the rebate in 2009.  The rebate allows first time home buyers to capture the $8,000 rebate.   The Senators have agreed that the tax rebate be extended to April 2010.  Next up is the vote of the House.  The House is expected to accept the package and send it to the President for signature.  It is expected that President Obama will gladly sign the extension.  In addition to the extension of the $8,000 tax rebate, they have agreed to expand the tax rebate to repeat buyers for a total of $6,500.

What impact will the extension and expansion have on our economy?  National Association of REALTORS® estimates that each home purchase contributes approximately $63,300 into our economy which is the approximate contribution of one new job.   Which organizations financially benefit from a home sale?  Here is a short list of some of them:

Realtor’s and Brokers:  6% commission on each sale.  Assuming the national average of a home sale is approximately $200,000 the commission per sale will average approximately $12,000. 

Settlement Agents:  The title companies and attorney’s generate income by selling the title insurance and providing legal services.

Mortgage Brokers:  Earn commission by writing your loans

Home inspectors and contractor’s:  Earn income on inspecting and then repairing the homes as needed.

Appraisers:  Earn their income for determing the value of your home

Financial institutions:  Earn their income through interest and numerous fee’s associated with your financing.

The first time home buyers rebate has had a big financial impact on our economy.  Expanding it to include a $6500 rebate to everyone will have a huge impact which will be covered in our next blog.

investnow.jpg 

Nearly 1.5 Million people have taken advantage of the $8,000 tax rebate since it’s conception in January 2009. The tax credit has been available to all first time home buyers. The first time home buyer is defined as anyone who has now owned their own home for three consecutive years. Oh, one more criteria for eligibility… It must be for your primary residence which is unfortunate for investors. The credit is in the form of a tax rebate for 10% of the purchase price of the home, up to a total of $8,000. One of the great benefits of the tax rebate is that is FULLY refundable to the buyer. For instance if the first time home buyer owed no taxes on their taxes, then the first time home buyer can ammend their tax return and capture the full $8,000.

The tax rebate has helped improve the national home sales. The current tax rebate is set to expire on November 30, 2009.  This means that the purchase must be fully closed and completed in order to qualify. It typically takes approximately 30 days to close on a home transaction with conventional bank financing. The point is that in order to be confident your purchase will qualify you should plan to be under contract to purchase your home by November 1, 2009. If you are trying to capture the $8,000 tax rebate and have not yet put your home under contract or you dont qualify for conventional financing then you need to consider finding an alternate approach. One alternate approach is to find seller financing. If the seller is providing the financing and you do not need to wait the typical 30 days for bank financing, then you can still close by December 1, 2009 without many challenges.

What about the possibility of extending the rebate past December 1, 2009?   There are currently several bills  in Congress that would allow the extension. Each of the bills in Congress provide alternate solutions toward the extension. Of course there is a lot of politics involved in completing the extension, from all poitical parties. Here is a brief summary of the extensions:

S1230:  Senator Johnny Isakson  introduced Senate Bill 1230 in June.  The Bill proposes a tax credit up to $15,000 that can be split over 2 year for everyone who purchases a home for their personal residence.

HR 2619:    This one  proposes to extend the existing $8,000 tax credit to July 1, 2010 and adds provisions for a tax credit of up to $3,000 for homeowners who refinance.  This would certainly create a ton of refinanes.  Is this part of the recent mortgage issue?  Many Americans seem to use their home equity as an ATM machine, pulling it out and spending it.  I guess that would potentially help spur the ecomony in the short term.

HR 2801 – Similar to S1230 but it extends benefits to January 1, 2011.

Several key politicians are publicly making comments about getting the extension approved by early November.  Those making positive comments include Senator Bill Nelson of Florida, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus.  They are hoping to extend the rebate along with unemployment benefits at the same time. 

One thing for sure is our current Government is committed to spending an unlimited amount to try and stimulate our ecomony.  Our Leaders appear to be committed to short term gains at the expense of future generations.  That said, extending the first time home buyer credit will certainly help encourage American’s to own their own home. 

What do you think?  Should the first time home buyers credit be extended?  Why or Why Not?  What are the short term benefits and long liabilities associated with this extension?  I would like to hear your viewpoints so please leave some comments.

From acquiring, to investing, to repairing, to staging, to appraising, to inspecting, to putting it on the market, to open houses, to listing, to contracts, to actually selling… the process of investing in and selling a home from start to finish can be confusing and a daunting task. We want to make it easy! We are working with a new home that a private lender has invested his money in to yield a great percentage. We are the experts in the field of home acquisition and investments. This particular home has just been acquired and is in the process of getting repairs and getting ready to go on the market… SO we have decided to do a series of blog entries following this home and it’s investors from the beginning to the day it sells.

 Welcome to WEEK FOUR (the FINAL week) of our entries: the process of investing in real estate from START to FINISH.

+++++++++++++++++

Oh man have we had an amazing experience with this latest property!

Okay, here is the rundown on who gets what on this investment:

What WE get:

ALL of the renovations are complete. We bought this property with a DOUBLE exit strategy in mind:

  1. We can rent it for a very positive monthly cash-flow
  2. We can sell it to a first time home buyer and we would get a nice chunk of income at closing

What the HOME BUYER gets:

We have listed this home using Just List ‘Em for $124,900.  A first time home buyer is able to purchase this home for LESS than renting with under $1,000 out of pocket to buy (since we are paying ALL of their closing costs) AND a monthly mortgage payment of around $850 per month.  The home buyer gets a HOUSE with very little out of pocket, a very low monthly payment, and the $8,000 Tax Credit from the Government.

The home owner also gets an affordable, renovated house with a dimensional shingle roof, new heating and air conditioning, 3 BR, 2.5 baths, nice fenced yard with deck and driveway, beautiful refinished hardwood floors, new kitchen appliances, etc. It doesn’t REALLY get any better than that.

What the IRA Investor Gets:

Our IRA investor gets a GREAT yield and is no longer losing money in the stock market.  Once this house sells, the investor wants us to move his money to another house so we can repeat the process again and continue to provide him a great return to his IRA.

Sounds to me like this is a win-win-win TRIPLE win situation. Everyone walks away happy.

Here are some pictures of the FINAL product: 

Living Room

Living Room

Kitchen

Kitchen

Bedroom

Bedroom

GREAT back yard

GREAT back yard

FINAL exterior of the house

FINAL exterior of the house

If YOU or someone you know is interested in this property, partnering with us on an investment, or considering selling your home, let us know. We would LOVE to work with you.

No, you’re not a dummy. I would never say that. But, I DO have to say, this whole “First-Time-Homebuyer-Tax-Credit” thing can be a bit confusing if you aren’t good with numbers, or taxes, or legislation. So, I’ve decided to break it down for you, so that maybe the whole thing will be a bit easier to swallow and/or comprehend. Here are some basic questions about the tax credit, ANSWERED, in a hopefully, clear and concise manner. 

  1. Who is eligible to receive this “tax credit” anyway? The tax credit can go to ANY person who is purchasing/buying a home for the FIRST TIME (in a three-year period) prior to December 1st, 2009. 
  2. What do you mean “three-year period”? Well, say you owned a home, a long time ago. But you have NOT owned a home in the last three years. Well, you’re eligible! But sorry married folks, if you or your spouse has owned a home, you don’t qualify. Only those who have NOT owned a home individually or jointly may qualify to receive the tax credit. 
  3. Wait, so how is the amount of the tax credit determined? Meaning, how much money will you get? The tax credit is equal to 10% of the purchase price/selling price of the home — up to a maximum of $8,000. So, if you purchase your house for $100,000, 10% of that would be $10,000. But that’s too much, so you would get the maximum credit of $8,000. Get it?
  4. How is this NEW first-time-home-buyer tax credit different from the one that Congress passed and enacted in July of 2008? The biggest difference is that THIS NEW tax-credit DOES NOT have to be repaid. I repeat. DOES NOT have to be repaid! Basically, the previous tax credit was like a loan that didn’t have any interest associated with it, basically making it not really an actual tax credit. However, the homebuyer MUST stay in the home for 3 years or else you may have to pay some of it back.
  5. Can you combine this tax credit in conjunction with any other first-time-home-buyer tax credits? Nope, sorry Greedy Gus, you can only choose one. 
  6. How do you make sure you are going to receive this tax credit? Well, you are going to file for this tax credit on your 2009 federal tax return and it will show up then. If you have any doubts, ask an accountant or CPA. I know that I, myself, am not always the best at filling out forms, so it’s always smart to have someone double check your work. Oh, and if you want to receive it early, talk to an accountant. You may be eligible to have less money taken out of your paychecks in 2008. Wouldn’t THAT be sweet? 

So, all in all, this NEW-First-Time-Homebuyer-Tax-Credit is a pretty awesome deal. Essentially making this the PERFECT time to buy a home. The market is TRULY a buyers market and you can only benefit from buying a home right now. 

Need to sell your home? Sell it yourself and save on commission. You can sell your home with our friends, Just List ‘Em

Now is the time to save money and earn the money you deserve. You’ve worked hard. Treat yourself.

-Jim Ingersoll

Jim Ingersoll

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 10 other followers

Twitter Feed

Blog Stats - Thanks for checking out our blog.

  • 15,877 hits

Top Clicks

  • None

Investing Now is a market relevant site for Real Estate today